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Adventure

River Valley Fun


Exploring our ribbon of green The nation’s largest expanse of urban parkland lies right here in Edmonton. The River Valley parks form an unbroken “ribbon of green,” stretching 48 km and covering 18,000 acres. The River Valley provides Edmontonians with an array of activities and events, especially during the summer months. Here’s what the River …Read More
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Exploring our ribbon of green

The nation’s largest expanse of urban parkland lies right here in Edmonton. The River Valley parks form an unbroken “ribbon of green,” stretching 48 km and covering 18,000 acres. The River Valley provides Edmontonians with an array of activities and events, especially during the summer months. Here’s what the River Valley has to offer you. .

 

Take in a Festival

Edmonton is a city with many titles: “Festival City” and “River City” to name a couple. It only seems natural to combine these two features when we can, giving Edmontonians the best of both worlds. Many of the River Valley festivals allow patrons to escape the city noise, enjoy the beauty of nature, and enjoy hours of music and culture. The Valley hosts a variety of music festivals to match just about any taste: The Edmonton Folk Music Festival comes to Gallagher Park every August; and the Edmonton Rock Music Festival, Interstellar Rodeo and Symphony Under the Sky can all be found in Hawrelak Park. During the summer, Harwelak Park also welcomes thespians and lovers of theatre as it hosts the Freewill Shakespeare Festival. You can enjoy (or critique) modern takes on the bard’s most famous plays. It’s also home to the popular Heritage Festival—a celebration of diversity and the cross-cultural bonds we share. . . . Hit the Trails and Rails An extensive network of trails criss-cross the River Valley, providing over 160 km of exploration for walkers, joggers and cyclists alike. They range from busy, paved routes to narrow, hard-packed trails that see little traffic. They form a nearly unbroken link across the city as you can travel from Hermitage Park in the northeast to the Fort Edmonton Footbridge in the southwest without ever leaving the River Valley. For those seeking something less intense, there are other transportation options. From May to October, the High Level Bridge Streetcar uses the former CPR tracks and a fleet of restored electric streetcars that ferry travellers from Jasper Plaza to Old Strathcona for $6 round-trip. Meanwhile, Edmonton’s new funicular whisks people (for free) from 100th Street down Grierson Hill and into Louise McKinney Riverfront Park—a great option for anyone daunted by the multitude of stairs leading from downtown to the river. High Level Bridge Streetcar: http://www.edmonton-radial-railway.ab.ca/highlevelbridge/ . .

Take a Tour

Exploration can be its own reward, but for the uninitiated it’s sometimes difficult to know where to start. Luckily, the River Valley boasts a number of tours as a starting point. For those looking to experience the River Valley’s natural beauty, try River Valley Adventure Co. They offer hour-long Segway tours that allow everyone from beginner to advanced, including those with limited mobility, to travel the trails. Revolution Cycle offers “pedelec” (electric bicycle) tours during the warmer months. These bikes use motors to assist with pedalling, which is handy for the uphill slogs. The two- and five-hour tours hit multiple points of interest in and around the River Valley. If history is more your niche, there’s a tour for that, too. Every day at the Legislature Building, you can join a guided tour to learn about Albertan history and politics. For those wanting to explore Edmonton’s settler history, make sure you take a tour of Fort Edmonton Park this summer, which is currently undergoing renovations, so many aspects of this tour will be unavailable. River Valley Adventure Co.: https://www.rivervalleyadventure.com/ Revolution Cycle: https://revolutioncycle.com/ .

Get Natural

Besides fresh air and great vistas, the River Valley is an obvious choice for viewing nature. The John Janzen Nature Centre is located by Fort Edmonton Park. It offers nature-themed programs and day camps for children. There are also two easy nature walks nearby that feature many native trees and shrubs. The Birch Tree Trail takes about 20 minutes, while the 3 km-long River Loop Trail encircles Fort Edmonton. For more of a wilderness feel, try the numerous ravines connected to the River Valley. Whitemud Creek Ravine is reported to have the highest diversity of plants and animals in the city, as there’s an old growth forest and over 150 species of birds. Mill Creek Ravine is easily accessible from Whyte Avenue; it’s a great place to birdwatch where you may just catch a glimpse of a boreal owl. .

Enjoy the Water

The North Saskatchewan River has always been an important feature of our city. For early settlers, it was the only mode of transportation for trade, making it Edmonton’s lifeline to the outside world. Now, you can rent a canoe or kayak and explore the Valley by water. And if you’re feeling ambitious, you can drive a watercraft of choice to the town of Devon and spend the day gently floating back home; just make sure you have a way to get back to your car afterwards. The river is also a great place for recreational fishing. With a valid licence, you can catch over eight species of fish in the river, though health advisories recommend against eating them. Want to catch your dinner? Head to Hermitage Park where you can cast your line into one of many stocked ponds. .

Head Down to the Beach

We’d be remiss not to mention that Edmonton now boasts its own beach—at least for the moment. The aptly, and popularly, named Accidental Beach took everyone by surprise in 2017, when it appeared near Cloverdale. Previously a sandbar, it emerged due to berms put in place for construction of the Tawatina LRT Bridge. Edmontonians quickly fell in love with it and hope it’ll become a permanent fixture. Admittedly though, its future is up in the air. Rising water levels, the removal of the berms in 2019/2020, and municipal regulations threaten its existence. In the meantime, if you choose to visit Accidental Beach this summer, consider taking public transit to cut down on the area’s traffic congestion. And always take out what you take in—including garbage. [post_title] => River Valley Fun [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => river-valley-fun [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-05-31 19:35:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-06-01 01:35:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.summercity.ca/?p=8986 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [ID] => 0 [filter] => raw [_excerpt] => Exploring our ribbon of green The nation’s largest expanse of urban parkland lies right here in Edmonton. The River Valley parks form an unbroken “ribbon of green,” stretching 48 km and covering 18,000 acres. The River Valley provides Edmontonians with an array of activities and events, especially during the summer months. Here’s what the River … ) 1

TIPS FOR RENTING A VEHICLE


Vacations should be relaxing, but they can get pretty stressful when you’re spending too much of your holiday checking bus schedules or flagging down expensive cabs. The solution: renting your own set of wheels. But before you hop into any car on the lot, check out these tips for getting the most out of your …Read More
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Vacations should be relaxing, but they can get pretty stressful when you’re spending too much of your holiday checking bus schedules or flagging down expensive cabs. The solution: renting your own set of wheels. But before you hop into any car on the lot, check out these tips for getting the most out of your rental.

Find the Rental Deals

There are dozens of rental agencies littered all around most airports of the world. But the first agency you come across will rarely offer the best deals, and what you gain in convenience is often reflected in the price. If you’re looking to save some money, consider taking a shuttle bus or a taxi to the city’s core, and do some shopping around.

Once you’ve found a suitable price, do a quick Internet search for the rental company in question. Pair this search with words like “promotion,” “offer code” or “coupon.” You’ll be surprised how many additional discounts are available through online promotions.

Get to Know Your Vehicle

A lot of rental cars will come with bumps and scratches from previous excursions. To avoid being accountable for these damages, make sure to perform your own inspection of the car before you drive it off the lot. Take note of any dents, scratches, engine trouble or anything else that just seems off. Then mention it. Document any discrepancies with your camera, and alert the agent who is carrying out your transaction. Whether it’s an honest oversight or a blatant scam, a quick survey of your vehicle will prevent a lot of unwanted rental headaches.

Be Insurance Savvy

You’re not obligated to buy insurance from the rental company, but most will offer you car insurance, and some will even pressure you to buy it. So do your research before you agree to any additional fees. If you’re already paying insurance for your own vehicle, it’s likely that your coverage extends to rentals of a similar vehicle type. If you’re unsure, call your insurance company to find out exactly what coverage you’re already paying for, and ask if it might be a good idea to agree to the additional fees.

Understand Your Contract

Are you allowed to take your rental car onto unpaved roads? Do you have a maximum kilometre limit? Is your rental one-way, or do you have to return it to the same agency from which you borrowed it? These are all important details that will be outlined in the fine print of your contract, so make sure to read it fully before you sign. Don’t hesitate to ask the rental agent for clarification on any confusing points.

Investigate the World of Car Sharing

If you’re planning on spending your trip in one city, you might want to consider a short-time subscription to a car-sharing service. Each service differs slightly, but standard practice has you paying based on your total distance travelled. Car shares can often be more convenient, cheaper and use subscriptions rather than contracts, so you’ll pay for only as much time as you use. The only major downside is that car shares restrict their users to travel within specific cities, so if you’re planning a road trip, it’s often better to stick to traditional rental models.  t8n

Did You Know?

In Canada, we’re familiar with minimum age requirements when it comes to car rentals. But in many countries, rental agencies impose maximum age limits, meaning that seniors and teens find themselves in the same boat when trying to rent a car.

Fun Fact

A 2014 survey found that car-share services in Canada own a total of 5000 vehicles and serve over 289,000 users. That number has only grown.

[post_title] => TIPS FOR RENTING A VEHICLE [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => tips-for-renting-a-vehicle [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-05-31 18:20:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-06-01 00:20:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.summercity.ca/?p=9293 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [_excerpt] => Vacations should be relaxing, but they can get pretty stressful when you’re spending too much of your holiday checking bus schedules or flagging down expensive cabs. The solution: renting your own set of wheels. But before you hop into any car on the lot, check out these tips for getting the most out of your … ) 1

THE MODERN VACATION SLIDE SHOW


8 tips for sharing your adventures online Remember the seemingly endless slide shows your grandparents shared with family whenever they returned from their vacations? Thankfully, those days are gone. These days, it’s a lot easier and more entertaining to share your vacation adventures with friends, family—and even strangers—online. With a few simple tools and rules, …Read More
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8 tips for sharing your adventures online

Remember the seemingly endless slide shows your grandparents shared with family whenever they returned from their vacations? Thankfully, those days are gone. These days, it’s a lot easier and more entertaining to share your vacation adventures with friends, family—and even strangers—online. With a few simple tools and rules, you’ll be on your way to choosing the right platform and sharing the world as you see it. Here are 8 tips to get you started.

1. Decide Why You’re Sharing

Grandpa never intended to put everyone to sleep with his slides, but he did want to share his joy with you. Why do you want to share? Deciding will help determine what things to share (images, text, video), how often (daily, weekly) and how much (word count, video length, etc.). If medieval architecture is your passion, sharing pictures of old churches is probably appropriate. If your travel goal, however, is to share your perceptions of

Central American life, you’ll probably be better off writing about the people. Make a plan, and stick to it.

2. Know Your Audience

Who are you intending to share with? Family? Friends? Complete strangers? The Internet makes sharing with everyone easy, but you decide on your audience. If you’re posting just for friends, you can be more relaxed with your writing and editing. If, however, you want to appeal to a wider audience, consider a bit more care, and be aware of the dangers of oversharing. Remember, it’s almost impossible to delete anything once it’s online, and nothing is truly private. Always be circumspect about which details you put out there.

3. Choose a Platform

There are so many ways to share online (see sidebar). Some travellers like to blog during their trips, posting daily summaries so readers can follow along. Others prefer to share their special moments instantly on social media (Facebook, etc.) and let the audience knit together their own narrative. Video blogging (vlogging) is also popular and a great way to share “home movies.” Thanks to technology, creating a good-looking video is quite easy.

4. Know Your Timeline

Consider when you intend to post. Grandpa’s slideshow happened after the trip was over, but with social media, people can enjoy real-time updates. But that means you will likely just be sharing a short note or posting a quick picture. If you choose to write a more detailed blog or want to focus on vlogging, there will be a time gap before your audience enjoys it. Mixing real-time updates with a blog that is days or weeks behind can become quite confusing. Consistency is the key here.

5. Choose Your Tools

Travelling with a laptop can make some things easier, but isn’t the point of a vacation to get away from it all? However, with a little discipline, smartphones or tablets can be easy to use with the data functions turned off. And the cameras on newer phones are amazing at making it easy to post images. Of course, if photographs are your thing, a traditional camera is a must; just be aware that downloading and sharing those images will require more of your energy and your computer’s.

6. Make Notes

Even people with great memories need reminders. If you have a particularly poignant moment or learn something new and interesting, take a moment to jot it down. With the advent of smartphones, you can do this electronically, but also consider keeping an old-fashioned pen and notepad handy. Use the ubiquitous pile of brochures and tour maps to recall your day, too. Snapping a quick picture of a sign or location that you can erase later can also help keep your information organized.

7. A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words

If you are writing a blog, rely on pictures to show the things that defy description. Don’t post multiple images that might look alike to your viewers; try taking images of interesting things that also have family or fellow travellers in them. That way you get the best of both worlds. Remember, too, that some pictures need captions; don’t assume people will know what they’re looking at.

8. Stay Connected

Figuring out how you’ll get online is worth a bit of forethought. Smartphones generally have some sort of worldwide data roaming, but often with hefty cost. Thankfully, if you avoid uploading lots of pictures, updates shouldn’t use much of your allotment. To avoid using precious data, keep on the lookout for Internet cafés. For smaller updates, free Wi-Fi can often be found in restaurants, hotels and shops. Remember, it’s worth being extra cautious when using someone else’s Internet; take care not to leave any logons or passwords on the system.  t8n

Be Yourself!

Your voice is important. People will enjoy your adventure much more if you inject your personality into your shares. Make it about your unique perspective and you might meet people out there who like to see the world the way you do.

Platforms, Platforms, Everywhere Platforms

Looking for ways to share your adventure? You’ll find plenty.

Here are a few to get you started:

Blogs—generally more text based; open to everyone; will give you a domain like mytrip.blogspot.com or holidayinfrance.wordpress.org to share

blogspot.com, wordpress.com, tumblr.com

Vlogs—video-hosting sites; can be public or private

Check out Youtube.com, Vimeo.com

Social Media—generally require you to invite followers; can be public or private; simple image sharing, automatically resizes images for quick uploading

Check out facebook.com, twitter.com, instagram.com

Specialized Travel Sites—generally offer things like notifications, auto-mapping, help in planning your trip and sharing with like-minded travellers; free and paid versions

Check out travelpod.com, mytripjournal.com, travellerspoint.com, tripatlas.com

[post_title] => THE MODERN VACATION SLIDE SHOW [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-modern-vacation-slide-show [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-05-31 18:17:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-06-01 00:17:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.summercity.ca/?p=9289 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [_excerpt] => 8 tips for sharing your adventures online Remember the seemingly endless slide shows your grandparents shared with family whenever they returned from their vacations? Thankfully, those days are gone. These days, it’s a lot easier and more entertaining to share your vacation adventures with friends, family—and even strangers—online. With a few simple tools and rules, … ) 1

The Prints and The Paper


Getting eclectic on 124th Street The Prints and the Paper, located on 10725-124th Street, is a difficult place to pin down. Equal parts graphic art gallery, independent bookshop, stationery seller and picture framer, it feels like the gift shop of the coolest museum you’ve ever visited. Not by accident, either. Owner Sandy Muldrew describes the …Read More
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Getting eclectic on 124th Street

The Prints and the Paper, located on 10725-124th Street, is a difficult place to pin down. Equal parts graphic art gallery, independent bookshop, stationery seller and picture framer, it feels like the gift shop of the coolest museum you’ve ever visited. Not by accident, either. Owner Sandy Muldrew describes the store as a curated shop of sorts—a place where he can sell the things he loves. The results, besides being an endorsement for doing what you love, is a much-needed reminder of the value and viability of brick and mortar in Edmonton. Yet, despite that lesson in viability, The Prints and the Paper, which opened in 2016, might not exist today if it wasn’t for certain jobs becoming redundant or obsolete. A TV editor for close to 20 years, Muldrew worked at the old A-Channel (now City) and at CBC-Edmonton. While there, he also managed and then co-owned the much-loved Sneak Preview Video in Duggan, which gave him his first taste of running a small business. In 2011 Sneak Preview went the way of most video stores, and a few years later CBC decided to eliminate all its dedicated editors. Finding himself out of work, Muldrew decided to take the leap and become his own boss. “This was sort of my retirement idea,” Muldrew explains. The concept for The Prints and the Paper was born of his various interests and skills: silkscreen printing, framing, film (there’s a Wes Anderson shrine by the front door), illustrated books and so on. It also came from an absence he noticed of galleries selling graphic art—and not just in Edmonton.
“I’ve been to New York, London and Paris, and have never seen this type of art for sale,” he says. “It’s always fine art, like paintings and photography, but never silkscreens.”
The decision to open on 124th Street took some time, but in the end it was an easy one. He looked around and was close to buying a space a block south of Whyte Ave., until some friends he was showing it to noticed a problem.
“We were there at one in the afternoon, and there was no one on the street,” Muldrew says. “This type of store needs walk-in traffic.”
The eventual location sees a lot of pedestrians, and many have discovered the store while visiting the Duchess Bake Shop across the street. With the presence of other independent shops in the neighbourhood, and the return of the 124 Grand Market to 108th Avenue this summer, the potential for curious shoppers dropping in is always high. Finding a great location for a store, however, is easier than actually opening one. “It was a lot harder than I thought,” Muldrew says.
“I thought because I owned Sneak Preview, that ‘Yeah, I can do this, I’ve done this before.’ But that was an established store.”
The Prints and the Paper, on the other hand, had to be started from scratch. Besides having to negotiate rent and secure funding, there was also the physical work that Muldrew and his brothers put into renovating the space before its doors could even open. Then came the challenge and cost of keeping the store replenished. Muldrew has to deal regularly with numerous suppliers, including book publishers, greeting-card publishers, framing-supply stores and artist collectives. “With the video store business, once you bought the product, you could just keep renting it out,” Muldrew explains. Now he has to replace stock constantly and stay within a budget. “That’s been a bit of a surprise, how much it costs. You want to expand your stock, but it’s tough unless you’re making a lot of money.” Business ledgers aside, the experience of running The Prints and the Paper has been hugely rewarding for Muldrew. There’s the undeniable joy of selling awesome stuff, much of it ephemera he owns himself. An example is his large personal collection of illustrated books that he used as a starting point for the books he now carries in-store. Other items he has found on his travels, or through customer recommendations, or by happenstance: the Cardboard Safari animal heads he bought in Amsterdam; the NYC water tower model kits he discovered in a museum gift shop there; or the CITIx60 travel guides he found by chance in a publisher’s catalog while searching for another book. But even better are the personal conversations he has with pleased customers.
“That’s really gratifying (and) good for my ego,” Muldrew says. “I get so many compliments about the store… people are happy I’m here.”
The store’s positive reception in the neighbourhood is a good sign of the vitality and future of 124th Street, which Muldrew describes as nearing a “tipping point.” It’s also a ringing endorsement of the independent storefront shops that the area is known for. “It gives character to the neighbourhood, and it’s enjoyable to come down here,” Muldrew explains. “I know a lot of people by their first name now. It’s become a destination for quite a few people.” As it turns out, people know a good thing when they see it. ___

New Eats on 124th Street

If you work up an appetite shopping on 124th, check out one of these recent arrivals for a quick bite: Chocorrant Patisserie & Cafe 10328 - 124 Street Opened April 2017 A “dessert boutique” serving decadent cakes, French pastries (with contemporary influences) and light lunches.  __ Zwick’s Pretzels 12415 - 107 Avenue Opened January 2017 A snack shop specializing in small-batch soft pretzels served with a full assortment of homemade cheese dips, mustards and sauces. [post_title] => The Prints and The Paper [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-prints-and-the-paper [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-05-26 21:50:48 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-05-27 03:50:48 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.summercity.ca/?p=5765 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [_excerpt] => Getting eclectic on 124th Street The Prints and the Paper, located on 10725-124th Street, is a difficult place to pin down. Equal parts graphic art gallery, independent bookshop, stationery seller and picture framer, it feels like the gift shop of the coolest museum you’ve ever visited. Not by accident, either. Owner Sandy Muldrew describes the … ) 1

Alberta Aviation Museum


The Alberta Aviation Museum New look, new stories, new adventure! With the recent closure of Edmonton’s City Centre Airport, you might have wondered if the airfield’s historic aviation museum would be shutting down, too. Well, wonder no more. Not only is the museum staying open, the staff and volunteers have been hard at work (for …Read More
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The Alberta Aviation Museum

New look, new stories, new adventure!

With the recent closure of Edmonton’s City Centre Airport, you might have wondered if the airfield’s historic aviation museum would be shutting down, too. Well, wonder no more. Not only is the museum staying open, the staff and volunteers have been hard at work (for over a year) reinventing the hangar to attract a new generation of museum-goers. The results are nothing short of impressive. In fact, if a visit wasn’t on your summer to-do list, squeeze it in. You’ll discover new exhibits, new stories and maybe even a passion for all things aviation. A New Vision If you remember visiting the Aviation Museum when you were younger, you’ll notice some big changes when you walk in the front doors. In the past, the hangar of the museum housed dozens of aircraft, each paired with a plaque. Today, the planes are still there, but instead of dusty plaques, they are now surrounded by life-sized dioramas, each telling an engaging and interactive story.
“We’re really trying to focus on the storytelling element,” says Zena Conlin, the museum’s marketing manager. “Instead of just plopping down an aircraft with a description next to it, we’re trying to put it into context through the visual design of the exhibit. One look, and you’ll be able to understand the plane’s role and imagine it in action.”
In the past, all the museum needed to do to attract crowds was land an interesting plane on the adjacent runway and invite aviation enthusiasts to come look at it. With the new residential zoning, however, this is no longer a possibility. Problematic? A bit, but Conlin says that this loss has actually breathed new life into the museum. “Initially, we thought that the rezoning would have a negative effect on the museum. But as time went on, we found that this really wasn’t the case. It’s given us the motivation to really dig into the history and present it in new and interesting ways.” Fortunately for us, that means hearing stories that have never been told. An Evolving Story Planes and mechanical histories aren’t the only exhibits you’ll discover are part of the museum’s new design. A focus has also been placed on the exploration of forgotten or ignored histories from Blatchford Airfield's past.
“A lot of the smaller stories of the airfield have been overlooked for a very long time, and we’re trying to bring them to light,” explains Conlin. “There were quite a few female pilots in the early days of aviation that haven’t really been glorified in the same way as their male counterparts. The same can be said of women who worked in the hangars or in radio control.”
As you’ll discover on your visit, the museum’s researchers have uncovered dozens of these forgotten histories, through a mix of archival research and studying the donated documents they’ve received from the community. “The more stories we can tell, and the bigger variety we can offer, the better we’ll be able to engage the public with our exhibits and events.” Even if planes don’t catch your interest, you’re bound to find a human story in Blatchford’s past that you can relate to. Living History As impressive as the exhibits are, they take up only half of the double-wide hangar that acts as the museum's home. On the other side, you’ll find the museum’s workshop space, where retired pilots, mechanics and hobbyists volunteer their time to restore old aircraft and talk to the public about their work. The museum’s oldest exhibit is the humble plough that first broke the ground when the Blatchford Airfield was first being constructed. While this artifact is integral to the story of aviation in Edmonton, it is still firmly rooted in the past and can be difficult for the average visitor to relate to. In the restoration space, you can see history come alive in the words and the demonstrations of the museum’s volunteers.
“We wouldn’t be able to do any of this without our volunteer team,” Conlin says. “As aviation technology changes, the knowledge and skills that older generations carry is in danger of being lost.” With the restoration space, this expertise and the living connection to history can be put on display for all museum-goers to see.
Did You Know? During the Second World War, Blatchford was the busiest airfield in the world. Over 800 allied planes would fly through on a daily basis, using Edmonton as a final stop before heading off to their wartime destinations. Alberta Aviation Museum 11410 Kingsway NW Edmonton, Alberta. T5G 0X4 Phone 780-451-1175 ___

CONTENT FROM 2017

Join the Celebration The Aviation Museum is only 25 years old, but the Blatchford Hangar is celebrating its 90th anniversary this summer. To mark the occasion, the museum has a number of special events planned this summer to celebrate this legacy: Drop-in Programs—Every Wednesday morning, kids ages 2 to 6 can enjoy crafts, songs, games and learn about aviation history. Free with regular admission. 90th Anniversary of Blatchford Field—Saturday, June 24, 10 am to 4 pm. Open Cockpit Day—Sunday, September 23, 10 am to 4 pm. [post_title] => Alberta Aviation Museum [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => alberta-aviation-museum [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-05-26 21:45:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-05-27 03:45:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.summercity.ca/?p=5762 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [_excerpt] => The Alberta Aviation Museum New look, new stories, new adventure! With the recent closure of Edmonton’s City Centre Airport, you might have wondered if the airfield’s historic aviation museum would be shutting down, too. Well, wonder no more. Not only is the museum staying open, the staff and volunteers have been hard at work (for … ) 1

Fort Edmonton’s Movie Nights


Soak Up Some Cinema – Relive History at Fort Edmonton’s Movie Night NOTE: THIS ARTICLE IS FROM 2017. FOR THE MOMENT, FORT EDMONTON IS NOT DOING MOVIE NIGHTS.  A  summertime getaway can be a beautiful thing. However, with busy highways, long lines at the airport and tourist-packed destinations, taking a summer vacation doesn’t always mean …Read More

Summer Health


Withstanding Summer’s Heat. Tips for sun-smart health Summer in the city: a season for wandering through street festivals, enjoying outdoor activities, relaxing in the sun and—ideally—not getting a sunburn along the way. Although welcome, the summer season brings with it a few intrinsic health risks to be wary of while out enjoying fun activities. To …Read More
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Withstanding Summer’s Heat. Tips for sun-smart health

Summer in the city: a season for wandering through street festivals, enjoying outdoor activities, relaxing in the sun and—ideally—not getting a sunburn along the way. Although welcome, the summer season brings with it a few intrinsic health risks to be wary of while out enjoying fun activities. To help you navigate them like a pro, here are some basic tips for avoiding and treating sunburns, dehydration and blisters this summer season. 

Staying Sun-conscious

Although a tan might be fashionable, the serious consequences of skin damage are not. To protect against UV radiation, use a water-resistant sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or greater and reapply it every two hours. If you have sensitive or acne-prone skin, consider using a non-comedogenic sunscreen or a mineral-based zinc titanium sunscreen lotion. Other sun-savvy options include wearing lightweight, long-sleeved clothing, sunglasses and hats and avoiding being out during midday when the sun’s radiation is most intense.

Healing Sunburns

Sunburns can still happen even when you’re careful. When they do, cool them off as quickly as possible by taking a cool shower or by using a cold compress. Do not, however, place ice directly on your skin. Some effective products that help soothe sunburns include aloe vera gel (try keeping it in the refrigerator), medication such as ibuprofen or aspirin (which help with pain and inflammation), and an anti-itch cream to relieve the itching that comes with healing. A cool bath with either a cup of baking soda or white/cider vinegar can help remedy sunburns as well.

Keeping Hydrated

The summer season is usually an active one, so take extra care to stay hydrated at pools and saunas, as you may not realize how much water your body has lost through exercise and perspiration. If the taste of plain water doesn’t do it for you, consider alternatives such as fruit and/or vegetable juices, smoothies, sports drinks, vitamin water, chilled herbal teas or water flavoured with lemon or lime.

Treating Blisters

Blisters are another common nuisance that pop up during summertime activities. Whether caused by hiking with new boots, adjusting to life in flip-flops or a campfire cooking burn, blisters should be left alone as much as possible since the top skin provides a protective barrier against bacteria, which aids in healing. That means avoid the temptation to pop them! If you can’t, apply an antibiotic ointment and a sterile,  loose bandage to protect the broken blister from further damage. [post_title] => Summer Health [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => summer-health [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-05-26 20:09:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-05-27 02:09:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.summercity.ca/?p=5792 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [_excerpt] => Withstanding Summer’s Heat. Tips for sun-smart health Summer in the city: a season for wandering through street festivals, enjoying outdoor activities, relaxing in the sun and—ideally—not getting a sunburn along the way. Although welcome, the summer season brings with it a few intrinsic health risks to be wary of while out enjoying fun activities. To … ) 1

Autumn Bucket List


An Autumn Bucket List   There’s nothing like a long and lingering fall in Alberta. The smell of harvest in the air, the rustle of leaves underfoot, the sight of geese overhead. For many, it’s the very best time of year. To celebrate it, here’s an autumn bucket list to look forward to.   Host …Read More
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An Autumn Bucket List

 

There’s nothing like a long and lingering fall in Alberta. The smell of harvest in the air, the rustle of leaves underfoot, the sight of geese overhead. For many, it’s the very best time of year. To celebrate it, here’s an autumn bucket list to look forward to.

 

Host a Backyard Movie Night—Why not skip the movie theatre and host a screening in your own backyard. It’s a great excuse to snuggle under the stars, and there are no lineups for popcorn. Your movie can be projected onto any light-coloured background (like a white sheet), and projectors can be checked out from most libraries. For the movie, pick a classic. Just keep it PG for the neighbours!

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Visit a U-Pick—There are great U-picks in our region, and every week yields something new. Many also sell homemade baking, preserves and honey and have play areas for families. Prairie Gardens, located in Bon Accord, even has a corn maze. But it’s not just kids having all the fun. Shady Lane Estate, a family owned farm and winery in Barrhead, sells artisanal wine made from the strawberries and orchard fruit grown on their farm. Check out page 35 for a list of U-picks in the region.

Click here for Edmonton's best U- Picks

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Ride the Railway or a Streetcar—There’s something magical about riding a train through the prairie landscape. And you don’t need an abundance of time or money to do it. The Alberta Railway Museum is open every summer weekend to explore, and you can even get all aboard on long weekends. If a streetcar is more your style, there’s no better destination than the High Level Bridge. The Edmonton Radial Railway Society website posts a schedule of departure times from Strathcona, as well as tons of historical information about their streetcars.

Click here for the High Level Street Car 

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Have a Food Truck Picnic—Street food and good times go hand in hand. And there’s nothing like being outdoors to work up an appetite. You’ll find trucks most Saturdays at farmers’ markets and at special events throughout the region. 

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Make Caramel Apples—When apples are in season, there’s no better treat than a caramel apple. Making them couldn’t be easier. The only secret? Start with your favourite apples. Then, simply unwrap a bag (340g) of caramels, and melt them in a pot over medium-low heat with 2 tbsp water. Next, spear each apple with a popsicle stick, roll them in the melted caramel and place them on buttered waxed paper to cool. To really go for it, roll the apples in chopped peanuts or Smarties before they hit the waxed paper.

[post_title] => Autumn Bucket List [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => autumn-bucket-list [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-05-26 20:19:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-05-27 02:19:18 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.summercity.ca/?p=1984 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [_excerpt] => An Autumn Bucket List   There’s nothing like a long and lingering fall in Alberta. The smell of harvest in the air, the rustle of leaves underfoot, the sight of geese overhead. For many, it’s the very best time of year. To celebrate it, here’s an autumn bucket list to look forward to.   Host … ) 1

Geocaching


The Hidden World of Geocaching A game (quietly) taking the world by storm By Robert Michon Geocaches are everywhere. In fact, you’re probably within walking distance of one right now. Alarmed? Don’t be. Geocaching is a fun exploration game that’s gained a strong following in the Edmonton area. In fact, Strathcona County is home to …Read More
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A game (quietly) taking the world by storm

By Robert Michon Geocaches are everywhere. In fact, you’re probably within walking distance of one right now. Alarmed? Don’t be. Geocaching is a fun exploration game that’s gained a strong following in the Edmonton area. In fact, Strathcona County is home to the second-oldest geocache in Canada. But how exactly do you play? Where did it even come from? And how do you get started? Wonder no more. We’ve got all the info you need to become a geocacher extraordinaire.

Just What Is Geocaching?

Geocaching is a type of way-finding game that uses GPS technology in order to lead players on a kind of scavenger hunt. Members of the geocaching community hide small waterproof containers in locations all around the world and post coordinates online for other geocachers to find. The containers always contain a logbook and, sometimes, a small trinket as a reward. When you find a geocache, you are meant to sign and date the logbook as proof of your victory, and you can even take a trinket from the cache, as long as you leave one of your own for the next geocacher to find. Anyone at all can play, as long as your cellphone has GPS capability. Geocache coordinates can bring you to almost any location, and they’re a great excuse to get out and explore. You’ll be finding hidden vistas, great trails and viewing your city from a fresh perspective.

A Brief History

Geocaching hasn’t been around long; its roots trace back only 16 years. In May of 2000, the American military made their jealously guarded GPS technology available to the general public, and only two days later, people had already begun to hide caches for their friends to find. The very first geocache was hidden in Portland, Oregon, and it was an instant hit, quickly spreading beyond the group of friends it was initially meant for. Today, geocaching is a worldwide phenomenon, with caches to be found on every continent. One has even left Earth entirely and is hidden aboard the International Space Station.

Rules of the Game

While the rules can vary by location, there are some basics for everybody to keep in mind to make the activity safe and fun for everyone. First off, geocaches cannot be placed on private property without the express permission of the owner. High-security areas, such as government buildings and schools, are typically off-limits, too. Geocaching employs a “leave no trace” policy, meant to preserve the natural state of the location. That means no garbage, vandalism or destruction of the area in your hunt for the cache, and if players find a disturbed site, they’re encouraged to clean it in order to preserve the reputation of the game. two young tourist determine the route map and navigator

Game Types

While there are hundreds of permutations of the game available, there are four main types that can easily be found around the city. Traditional caches are the basic cache type that started the whole trend. You get a set of coordinates, maybe a hint if you’re lucky, and you set off looking. Puzzle caches (sometimes called mystery caches) make you work for those essential coordinates. They’re hidden within a riddle, cipher or some other puzzle, which must be solved before the hunt can even begin. Multi-caches take you on a bit of a ride. Instead of a notebook to sign, each cache contains yet another set of coordinates, which ultimately brings you to the final location. Event caches are gatherings of 50 or more people (rather than typical small groups), all competing to find the most caches in an area in a certain amount of time. Even mega-events (which include a minimum of 500 people) are planned. Whether you love solving mysteries, being taken on tours, visiting scenic vistas or exploring underrated locations, there is probably a geocaching variant to suit your ability level and interest. It’s fun for families. It’s fun with friends. And it’s even fun alone. Now that you know all about it, you’ve got no excuses. Get out there and start caching!

Geocaching Lingo for Beginners

Muggle: a non-geocacher FTF: First to find. A high achievement for cachers. BYOP: Bring your own pen. Make sure you sign the logbook! DNF: Did not find. Better luck next time.   GZ: Ground zero. You’re in the right spot. Take a look around. Power Trail: Multiple caches in quick succession for easy finds. Trackable: Trinkets that travel from cache to cache. [post_title] => Geocaching [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => geocaching [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-05-25 22:39:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-05-26 04:39:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.summercity.ca/?p=1980 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [_excerpt] => The Hidden World of Geocaching A game (quietly) taking the world by storm By Robert Michon Geocaches are everywhere. In fact, you’re probably within walking distance of one right now. Alarmed? Don’t be. Geocaching is a fun exploration game that’s gained a strong following in the Edmonton area. In fact, Strathcona County is home to … ) 1

Travel Canada


East, West, Home Is Best Make our nation your destination By Vanessa Roset You’ve heard the saying, “Not all those who wander are lost.” It is the globetrotter’s mantra, often printed on inspirational travel posters designed to lure us abroad. But how often do we wander in our own backyards? From coast to coast, Canada …Read More