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Farmers’ Market Meals


Spice up your summer with these fabulous local finds Buying locally is ideal for not only the economy but your family as well. This summer, take advantage of what’s available from the following featured merchants who’ll be showcasing their edible wares at select farmers’ markets in the Capital Region. But don’t stop there. Try some …Read More
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Spice up your summer with these fabulous local finds

Buying locally is ideal for not only the economy but your family as well. This summer, take advantage of what’s available from the following featured merchants who’ll be showcasing their edible wares at select farmers’ markets in the Capital Region. But don’t stop there. Try some of the recipes listed below using those items to taste what a difference local produce and other foods brings to the table.

Pair homemade falafel patties from INFUSION with pita bread from HAPPY CAMEL. Serve with fresh slaw made with veggies from PEAS ON EARTH and KUHLMAN’S and a homemade yogurt dip.

Veggie Slaw

A colourful appetizer to get that patio party going.

kohlrabi

red cabbage

peppers

carrots

cilantro

Matchstick all the vegetables, mix together and add to a bowl. Put a dollop of yogurt dip (see recipe below) in the corner, add the falafel patties and garnish with cilantro and pita wedges.

Yogurt Dip

This creamy dip is cool and refreshing on a hot summer day.

3 mini cucumbers, shredded and drained

¾ c. greek yogurt

1 tsp. salt

1 tsp. pepper

1 tsp. fresh dill (more if dill
is a favourite flavour)

Combine all ingredients together in a bowl. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Pair green onion cakes from THE GREEN ONION CAKE MAN, homemade salad rolls and samosas from MINI KITCHEN, with two homemade dipping sauces.

Salad Rolls

Try a new take on a popular Vietnamese treat.

Rice paper wrappers

Rice stick (vermicelli) noodles

Fresh cilantro

1-2 carrots, peeled and julienned or matchstick pieces

1 mango, peeled and julienned

1 pepper, julienned

1 cucumber, julienned

chopped cashews or peanuts (optional)

Soak noodles in hot water for approximately 10 minutes, drain and rinse with cold water, set aside.

Rice paper wrappers soak in warm water until soft and rollable.

Set up on a cutting board an assembly line like array of all your ingredients.

Place your soaked wrapper on a dry dish towel or a few paper towels, pat dry the top. In the middle of the wrapper put some noodles, a few of each of the chosen vegetables/fruit, a sprinkle of nuts and some fresh cilantro. Fold the bottom and the top in and roll up as if it was a burrito.  Serve as a whole roll or cut in half.

While finishing up the remainder of the rolls, keep the made ones soft by covering with a damp paper towel. 

Sweet & Spicy Dip

A little something to tempt all of your tastebuds.

¼ c. rice vinegar

2 tbsp. soy sauce

2 tbsp. warm water

2 tsp. brown sugar

Splash of lime juice

1 tsp. red pepper flakes

Whisk ingredients together until combined, garnish with julienned green onions.

Almond Dipping Sauce

Now here’s a delicious way to get some fibre in you!

4 tbsp. almond butter

1 ½ tbsp. soy sauce

1 ½ tbsp. brown sugar

2 ½ tbsp. warm water

splash of lime juice

shake of red pepper flakes

Craft beer & Saskatoon Berry Fizz

A delicious prairie rendition of moonshine is Berry good indeed!

½ c. craft beer

175 ml Saskatoon berry cider

2 shots of Saskatoon berry moonshine

Mix together, serve over ice in a cocktail glass!

Pair a jar of RED HOUSE SALSA with freshly chopped avocado and serve with EL GRINGO homemade tortilla chips.

Put together a charcuterie platter from many delicious treats from the Farmers’ Market. Include treats like: a variety of olives from OLIVE ME, a hard cheese from GRAPEVINE DELI paired with fresh honeycomb also from GRAPEVINE DELI, spicy pumpkin seeds from GOING NUTS, fresh bread sticks from BREADLOVE, delicious sausage and Biltong from TWIGGY STICKS BILTONG, grainy mustard and dried fruit. Another delicious addition to any charcuterie tray would be apple and pear slices.

Have fun with your snack ideas, including colourful popcorn from ORIGINAL CANADIAN KETTLE and savoury/sweet temptations from GOING NUTS.

[post_title] => Farmers' Market Meals [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => farmers-market-meals [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-06-07 17:57:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-07 17:57:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.summercity.ca/?p=13332 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [ID] => 0 [filter] => raw [_excerpt] => Spice up your summer with these fabulous local finds Buying locally is ideal for not only the economy but your family as well. This summer, take advantage of what’s available from the following featured merchants who’ll be showcasing their edible wares at select farmers’ markets in the Capital Region. But don’t stop there. Try some … ) 1

LIVING CORAL


2019’s Pantone colour of the year Your colour inspiration has arrived! With spring well under way, we are all excited to have said goodbye to winter’s white and hello to the many colours that the new season brings blossoming with it. Hue gurus Pantone chose “Living Coral” as the colour for 2019, which emits these …Read More
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2019's Pantone colour of the year

Your colour inspiration has arrived!

With spring well under way, we are all excited to have said goodbye to winter’s white and hello to the many colours that the new season brings blossoming with it. Hue gurus Pantone chose “Living Coral” as the colour for 2019, which emits these desired, familiar, and energizing aspects of colour found in nature. And surely it will inspire a variety of visually pleasing art, décor, food, and fashion this summer. From bridal bouquets to bow ties and cotton candy to key chains, here’s a glance at what’s “living” this year.

The Cotton Candy Shoppe "Fruit Punch" Cotton Candy from Corro Collective $3
Wedding Bouquet from the Wheelbarrow Florist. Starting at $250
Women's Blouse from Monjeleco Jeans $38 from Lava & Luxury and Gratitude Bracelets by the Masterful Princes $30 each from Corro Collective
Wooden Decoupage Hearts from Whimsical Vintage Creations $20 & $35
The Jewelry Rack Necklace from Whimsical Vintage Creations $20
[post_title] => LIVING CORAL [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => living-coral [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-05-21 20:10:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-05-21 20:10:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.summercity.ca/?p=13344 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [_excerpt] => 2019’s Pantone colour of the year Your colour inspiration has arrived! With spring well under way, we are all excited to have said goodbye to winter’s white and hello to the many colours that the new season brings blossoming with it. Hue gurus Pantone chose “Living Coral” as the colour for 2019, which emits these … ) 1

Fashion & Art


A melding of two creative disciplines inspires a tapestry of wonder. For decades, visual art has triggered the creative impulses of top designers around the world, but its melding has never been more vivid than in recent years. Which is why we put the works of abstract landscape painter Samantha Williams-Chapelsky, a two-time recipient of …Read More
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A melding of two creative disciplines inspires a tapestry of wonder.

For decades, visual art has triggered the creative impulses of top designers around the world, but its melding has never been more vivid than in recent years. Which is why we put the works of abstract landscape painter Samantha Williams-Chapelsky, a two-time recipient of the Mayor’s Celebration of the Arts to the test. The result? A contrast of art and fashion that passes with flying colours.

“The Place That Cannot Be” Acrylic on Canvas 40” Diameter $3000 Free People One Fine Day Mini Dress $170 with Free People Montgomery Slouch Boot $328 from Pink Paire
“I Am Lost And Found” Acrylic on Canvas36” x 36” $2500 “I Reflect You, You Reflect Me” Acrylic on Canvas 36” x 36” $2500 Gentle Fawn Heron Kimono $55, Black Tape Tank $40 from Pink Paire , Candice Skinny Jeans $140 from Monjeloco Jeans and Ted Baker Saviopl Heels $280 from Cerulean Boutique
“The World’s Greatest” Acrylic on Canvas 40” Diameter $2500 Faithfull The Brand Ari Midi Dress $160 from Pink Paire
[post_title] => Fashion & Art [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => fashion-art [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-05-21 18:58:53 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-05-21 18:58:53 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.summercity.ca/?p=13342 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [_excerpt] => A melding of two creative disciplines inspires a tapestry of wonder. For decades, visual art has triggered the creative impulses of top designers around the world, but its melding has never been more vivid than in recent years. Which is why we put the works of abstract landscape painter Samantha Williams-Chapelsky, a two-time recipient of … ) 1

Summercity.ca Bingo


Play a fun game of Bingo, upload your photos and you can win. Submit your photos here https://www.summercity.ca/my-summer-in-the-city/Read More

KIDS GETTING INTO THE LEMONADE BUSINESS


Make lemonade—and money—from lemons this summer Simple, cool, refreshing — nothing says summer quite like a delicious cup of lemonade. So why not turn your love of lemonade into a business? Setting up your own stand is a great way to make some extra money this summer and it’s super easy to do. Following our …Read More
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Make lemonade—and money—from lemons this summer

Simple, cool, refreshing — nothing says summer quite like a delicious cup of lemonade. So why not turn your love of lemonade into a business? Setting up your own stand is a great way to make some extra money this summer and it’s super easy to do. Following our tips below, you’ll be well on your way to a fun and profitable summer.

Pick Your Spot

One of the first things you’ll want to do is choose a location for your stand. Some kids like to set up shop in front of their homes. That’s a great idea, if your parents are busy and you don’t want to carry your stuff too far. Older, more ambitious kids, though, might look for a place with more foot traffic — near parks, festivals, farmers’ markets or businesses, for example. Just make sure that wherever you go, you have permission to sell lemonade there.

Take a Stand

So, now you have your location. Before you can start selling lemonade and making money, though, you’ll need an actual stand. Pick out a table and chairs that are sturdy and large enough, but which can also fold up, making them easier to move. And remember to bring a nice tablecloth to cover your table. It’ll make your stand look nicer and more professional — attracting more customers — and help keep your table clean from spills.

Bring the Supplies

Besides your stand, you’ll have to pick up some necessities. Obviously, you’ll need a pitcher for your lemonade, preferably one with a cover to keep the bugs out. Bring plenty of cups as well so that your customers have something to drink with. You might also want to provide other extras: napkins, straws, and maybe even ice. Just remember, though, not to make too much garbage. The cups and any other supplies you provide should be easy to recycle.

Spread the Word

Next, you’ll have to let people know that you’re open for business. Make a few eye-catching posters and signs to tell your customers where and when you’re open. You’ll also need a sign to put on your stand to display your prices. If you’re good with computers, there are some useful programs and apps you can use to create awesome posters or signs. You might even want to use social media, like Facebook or Instagram, to get the word out before and during your open hours.

Set a Price

Another thing to think about is how much you’re going to charge. This may take some planning. If you’ve spent money on supplies—such as lemonade powder or cups—you will want to sell enough lemonade to make that money back and turn a profit, as well. When deciding how much to charge for your delicious lemonade, you don’t want to charge too much or too little. It might also be a good idea to charge an easy-to-remember price, such as $1 per cup. This will make it easier to calculate prices if customers buy more than one cup at a time, and it will make it easier to count back change.

Turning Lemons into Lemonade

Last, but not least, you’ll need to make lemonade. There are almost as many different recipes out there as there are lemons. Here are two you can try out on your own:

Simple Homemade Lemonade

6 cups water

2 ½ cups sugar

2 cups freshly squeezed lemon juice

Lemon slices

Ice (optional)

Add the sugar to the water and stir until it’s dissolved. Add the freshly squeezed lemon juice. Refrigerate until chilled, then add the lemon slices and ice. Serve.

Orange Lemonade

2 ½ cups warm water

6 cups cold water

1 ½ cups orange juice

12 fresh lemons

1 ½ cups sugar

2 tbsp. lemon zest

Squeeze and remove the juice from the lemons. Make the lemon zest by grating the lemon peels. Set aside. Add the
sugar to the warm water and stir until dissolved. Add the cold water, orange juice, lemon juice, and lemon zest.
Refrigerate to chill. Serve.

[post_title] => KIDS GETTING INTO THE LEMONADE BUSINESS [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => kids-getting-into-the-lemonade-business [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-06-07 17:57:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-07 17:57:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.summercity.ca/?p=13321 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [_excerpt] => Make lemonade—and money—from lemons this summer Simple, cool, refreshing — nothing says summer quite like a delicious cup of lemonade. So why not turn your love of lemonade into a business? Setting up your own stand is a great way to make some extra money this summer and it’s super easy to do. Following our … ) 1

The Great BBQ Fuel Forum


Summer’s back, meaning it’s time to revisit a heated debate With barbecue season upon us, it’s a good time to bone up on your barbecue game. That might be difficult, given the dizzying array of barbecue choices on the market. We take a quick look at the various options out there in terms of their …Read More
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Summer’s back, meaning it’s time to revisit a heated debate

With barbecue season upon us, it’s a good time to bone up on your barbecue game. That might be difficult, given the dizzying array of barbecue choices on the market. We take a quick look at the various options out there in terms of their heat source: gas, charcoal, or electric.

Gas

Gas barbecues, like the name says, use a gas to provide the heat to cook meat. The gas may vary, but commonly it is propane, butane, or natural gas. Of the various barbecue methods, gas might be the happy medium—you get the flavour of an open flame without the learning curve of cooking with charcoal or hardwood. But, as they do use an open flame, which can flare up, gas grills need to be kept a safe distance from structures—like your house—to avoid fires. And that means space is needed,
something your average apartment or condo dweller may not have. Nonetheless, gas barbecues are relatively simple to use, as they make it easy to provide a constant level of heat, making them the go-to choice with many backyard chefs.

Charcoal

Charcoal grills have exploded in popularity in recent years. The reason? It’s all about the taste. No other heat source, arguably, captures the flavour of smoke the way that charcoal does. Another benefit of charcoal is that it can be started and used with almost no open flame, making some varieties of charcoal grills okay to use in smaller spaces (some buildings might still not allow charcoal barbecues on balconies, though). It’s also a slow cooking option and requires a lot of patience and time to learn how to cook with those black lumps. Charcoal is also dependent on atmospheric conditions to take BBQ to the max. On humid, windless days, there may not be enough oxygen for the charcoal to burn constantly.

Electric

Finally, electric grills are another option for barbecue aficionados. These will use electricity as their heat source, making them ideal in many cases for apartment balconies, and some varieties can even be safely used indoors. Although not as popular as gas, and often more expensive, electric grills are quick and convenient. For those seeking optimal flavour, however, electricity may not be the way to go. For obvious reasons, they don’t quite capture the flavour of smoke, and they may not provide the intense heat required for searing. They are easy to use however, providing instant and predictable heat at the press of a button, making them ideal for quick meals and rainy days.

[post_title] => The Great BBQ Fuel Forum [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-great-bbq-fuel-forum [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-05-21 18:35:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-05-21 18:35:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.summercity.ca/?p=13317 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [_excerpt] => Summer’s back, meaning it’s time to revisit a heated debate With barbecue season upon us, it’s a good time to bone up on your barbecue game. That might be difficult, given the dizzying array of barbecue choices on the market. We take a quick look at the various options out there in terms of their … ) 1

Summer movies


Here are the highlights of some of the movies coming out this summer. This list is sponsored by Variant Edition Comics & Graphic Novels. June 7, The Secret Life of Pets 2. June 7 Dark Phoenix June 14 Men in Black, International June 21, Toy Story 4 July 2 Spiderman, Far From Home July 19 …Read More

THE STURGEON BY KAYAK


Experiencing a wilder, wetter side of St. Albert The Sturgeon River has provided many different things throughout the central Alberta region’s history, from food and water to transportation, habitation and recreation. These days, a growing appreciation of the local waterway’s ecological importance and understated beauty is drawing many folks from the Edmonton area and surrounding …Read More
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Experiencing a wilder, wetter side of St. Albert

The Sturgeon River has provided many different things throughout the central Alberta region’s history, from food and water to transportation, habitation and recreation. These days, a growing appreciation of the local waterway’s ecological importance and understated beauty is drawing many folks from the Edmonton area and surrounding communities back to the water. And there are so many ways to enjoy that water now, too, including by kayak. These ancient, low-impact
watercraft are not only fun and easy to use, but also provide an entirely new perspective of our home by the river.

Close to Water

There’s no preamble, no safety lessons or even a kayaking 101 lecture. Within a few minutes of showing up at the boat launch in Riel Park, I’m on the water in a 12-foot, 50-lb. kayak, as if I’ve been doing this sort of thing for years. (I haven’t.) Not that there’s much need for formalities—unlike many other recreational activities, kayaking really is as easy as it looks. The distinctive boat sits low in the water, giving it greater stability than a typical canoe. Manoeuvrable and quick, it responds very well, even for the novice, darting forward with just a few strokes and (almost) stopping on a dime. It’s a comfortable ride, too—braces inside the seating area, including a backrest and footrests, make for easy, low-impact exploration.

The Sturgeon River is also a great venue for the first-time kayaker. According to Sean Demidovich of Active Recreational Rentals, the Sturgeon is a big draw for many of his customers, especially through the spring and early summer. A popular route for many clients is to float downstream from Riel Park to downtown or even further.

On this mid-July morning, however, weeds are already choking much of the sluggish river. Instead of heading off for a jaunt through town, for a few minutes I simply try out the area around the boat launch, getting a feel for the water. Unlike other modes of aquatic travel, kayaks really put you in touch with the thing you’re moving through—you feel you’re in the water, as much as you’re on it. I stop for a moment to watch the dark head of a muskrat bobbing past as it crosses from one bank to the other. Then I turn the kayak upstream and make my way to more open water.

Birds of a Feather

Another advantage of kayaks, at least as far as the soloist is concerned, is the paddle. The distinctive spoon blades at either end allow for more strokes and a rhythmic pace, as the kayaker isn’t constantly switching the paddle from one side of the boat to the other. This means kayaks tend to “track” (i.e. move in a straight line) more easily than other watercraft. While canoes don’t necessarily require more skill to paddle, the fact is even a beginner like myself can feel (and look) pretty masterful in a kayak.

Though there’s no current to fight against, I take my time as one of the river’s greatest draws soon reveals itself. The riverbanks and in the shallows of Big Lake are home to a great diversity of birds. I spot three dowitchers, plump birds on stick-like legs that poke for invertebrates in the mud with their long, sensitive beaks. As I coast toward them, the wary birds swim off into the denseness of the rushes.

Meanwhile, a male red-winged blackbird flies back and forth across the river, perching on the tall rushes on either side. While the females tend to stay out of sight, the males are gregarious attention-getters, with the plumage to match: glossy black all over with bright, orange-red shoulder patches that flutter beautifully when the bird is in flight.

Black terns are another recognizable species, spotted more easily for their distinctive hunting behaviour than their grey-to-dark colouring. Like dragonflies, they hover over the water and frequently dart at the surface when they spot a soon-to-be unfortunate bug or fish. They’re also known for aggressively defending their nests by dive-bombing anyone who wanders too close, to the point that the nearby boardwalk had to be shut down at one point.

A Big Lake

In many ways, a kayak is the perfect way to explore the nooks and crannies of the Sturgeon and the lake it flows through. Those slow-moving waters offer little resistance, allowing paddlers to explore at their leisure. Compared to other watercraft, especially the motorized variety, kayaks have less of an impact on the environment. As self-powered vehicles, they don’t leak gas or oil into water and their lower speeds in shallow waters don’t cause erosion to shorelines.

On the other hand, any vehicle (and the human presence that accompanies it) causes at least some disruption to fragile ecosystems. The fact that kayaks can go places other vehicles can’t—like uncomfortably close to nesting areas—places the onus on the user to enjoy this environment responsibly. It’s one good reason why Alberta Parks has considered enacting a total boat ban for Big Lake as part of the draft management plan for the provincial park that surrounds it.

Such a ban would be disappointing to some boaters, but it would be understandable. The lake, the centrepiece of Lois Hole Centennial Provincial Park, is known for its wetlands habitat, an ecosystem valued for its ability to absorb and purify large amounts of water, process carbon and inorganic nutrients, stabilize shorelines, and provide food and homes to a wide range of plants and animals, especially birds. Wetlands are considered the most biologically diverse of ecosystems, and at Big Lake it’s easy to see why. Up to 237 bird species have been recorded there, with around 180 reportedly using the site annually. Due to this diversity of life, and the importance of the provincial park in conserving the wetlands, Big Lake is recognized globally as an Important Bird and Biodiversity Area (IBA), a listing developed by BirdLife International to recognize important bird habitats around the world.

Back Again

After two hours of paddling, with the water refracting the midday sun and a blanket of heat hazing the surroundings, it’s time to head back to Riel. Like other journeys, things look different on the return. On the horizon, new subdivisions are going up as a fast-growing city, by necessity, swallows up the open spaces around it. One wonders how we’ll experience this and other natural places in the future, and if we’ll be able to balance a newfound appreciation with the competing demands of development,
recreation, and conservation.

Active Recreational Rentals

Open 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., 7 days a week
Call (587) 588-9226
Email sean@activerec.ca
Visit https://activerec.ca/

Sean Demidovich of Active Recreational rents and sells a variety of kayaks. Rentals are $30 for two hours or $60 for solo kayakers for the day and include life jacket, paddle, and some basic instructions. Sean also offers free kayak drop-off and pickup within St. Albert. Delivery and pickup throughout the Edmonton region also possible for an added fee.

[post_title] => THE STURGEON BY KAYAK [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-sturgeon-by-kayak [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-05-21 18:15:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-05-21 18:15:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.summercity.ca/?p=13296 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [_excerpt] => Experiencing a wilder, wetter side of St. Albert The Sturgeon River has provided many different things throughout the central Alberta region’s history, from food and water to transportation, habitation and recreation. These days, a growing appreciation of the local waterway’s ecological importance and understated beauty is drawing many folks from the Edmonton area and surrounding … ) 1

Where There’s S’mores, There’s Fire A rite of summer on the Prairies, the classic campfire lights the way to a glorious evening


Anyone who’s sat around a campfire as twilight turns to night knows how easy it is to lose one’s thoughts in a flicker of flame. After all, there’s something about a blazing fire that takes us away from the world and its worries, to a place in our minds that’s primeval and mysterious. Perhaps fire …Read More
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Anyone who’s sat around a campfire as twilight turns to night knows how easy it is to lose one’s thoughts in a flicker of flame. After all, there’s something about a blazing fire that takes us away from the world and its worries, to a place in our minds that’s primeval and mysterious. Perhaps fire fascinates us because it’s a study in opposites—one moment, it’s dangerous and the next moment, it’s a source of comfort.Whatever it is, those flames have been casting its spell for a very long time.

Philosophical musings aside, most can agree that few things set the mood for an evening of relaxing companionship like a hearty fire. Whether you’re at a campground, cabin, or just chilling around your backyard fire pit, a crackling fire is a perfect way to wind down your summer days. It all starts with some firewood and a sturdy axe. Make sure you leave a few thick, slow-burning logs to toss on as the fire starts to dim. Just don’t forget the marshmallows, once you’ve got a decent fire happening.

Building a Campfire 101

The ingredients of a campfire are simple: heat, oxygen, and fuel. The heat is easily supplied with a lighter or matches, and the oxygen is all around you, so that leaves the fuel.

You’ll need three types: tinder, kindling, and chopped firewood. The tinder should be easy to ignite—paper, leaves, even lint will do. Make a loose pile that can breathe easily, then build your kindling around it. Kindling consists of smaller pieces of wood like sticks, branches, or wood chips. These will catch fire easily, but burn longer than tinder.

Next, light the tinder in several places, and fan or blow on it to supply more oxygen. As the flames grow and the kindling catches, start feeding it with firewood—carefully, and with smaller pieces first, until the fire’s well on its way. Kick back and enjoy your night by firelight.

Where to Get Firewood

For the occasional fire builder, it’s easy to buy firewood in the Edmonton area, where many stores, supermarkets, and service stations sell it in bags and boxes. A bundle of wood is typically 0.75 cubic feet, roughly containing up to nine pieces and selling for less than $10. Depending on how big or how long-burning you want your fire to be, five to ten bundles should do for an evening’s fire. Like most things, buying in greater quantities is more economical, and if you’re planning on a lot of fires this summer, bigger might be better.

Also available at many stores are composite logs. Made from sawdust and wood waste cut into log shapes, these products are arguably a greener alternative, as they burn longer and more efficiently than firewood, and give off less carbon monoxide. A six-pack of three-hour logs typically costs between $15 and $25.

Upscale Your S’mores

When the fire’s good and roaring, the natural inclination is to bring out the smokies, the traditional main course of many fireside feasts. And you can’t forget a kiddie favorite like the s’more, consisting of two graham crackers, one golden oozing marshmallow and one chunk of chocolate. But adults might want to tinker with the s’mores formula to suit more mature tastes. So it doesn’t hurt to experiment with dark or flavoured chocolate, substitute oatcakes or cookies for the graham crackers, or dunk your creation in a salted-caramel sauce. You’re only limited by the number of marshmallows left in the bag. Here’s a recipe to get you started.

“Gourmet” Cherry Chocolate S’mores

1 artisanal marshmallow (because we’re being fancy here)

2 butter cookies (but not shortbread, which will crumble)

1 square cherry-flavoured chocolate (the really expensive kind)

1 tbsp cherry preserves (that’s jam)

Toast marshmallow over an open flame. Top one cookie with chocolate, artisanal toasted

marshmallow, cherry preserves, and the remaining reserved cookie. Eat.

Firepit Rules and Regs

In Edmonton, the Community Standards Bylaw regulates fire pit usage. According to this bylaw, fire pits must be installed a minimum of three metres from buildings, property lines, and anything that can burn. They should be less than 0.6 metres high and a metre wide, and they should have enclosed sides and a mesh screen with openings no larger than 1.25 cm. Care should be taken to minimize the amount of smoke a fire creates, and, as elsewhere, fire bans must be respected. For fuel, only use charcoal or clean, dry wood (in other words, no pallet fires in your backyards please). For more info, check the City of Edmonton website or one that’s pertinent to your municipality or county.

[post_title] => Where There’s S’mores, There’s Fire A rite of summer on the Prairies, the classic campfire lights the way to a glorious evening [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => where-theres-smores-theres-fire-a-rite-of-summer-on-the-prairies-the-classic-campfire-lights-the-way-to-a-glorious-evening [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-05-21 18:06:02 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-05-21 18:06:02 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.summercity.ca/?p=13290 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [_excerpt] => Anyone who’s sat around a campfire as twilight turns to night knows how easy it is to lose one’s thoughts in a flicker of flame. After all, there’s something about a blazing fire that takes us away from the world and its worries, to a place in our minds that’s primeval and mysterious. Perhaps fire … ) 1